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Steroids:

It's amazing what athletes will do to get higher levels of performance and to get an edge on the rivaled competition. People don’t realize the long term effects that result from the decisions they make early in life. Steroids became a spreading exposure to athletes in the Olympics. This use of steroids among athletes became apparent when Canadian sprint runner Ben Johnson tested positive for steroid use after winning the gold medal for the 100 meter dash during the 1988 Olympics. Now a skinny fifteen year old can walk down to the local gym and find sellers to get the drug that will make him the idol of all his classmates. Being such an attractive drug and seeming harmless to the unaware user, steroids can have a potentially jeopardous effect. Consistently, users, new and experienced, have no knowledge to the dangerous consequences' steroids can have on their minds and bodies. Steroids cause minimal deaths in our society, banning of steroids is purely justified because steroids have extremely perilous side effects on the unsuspecting user.

Though steroids are known as a somewhat dangerous substance, they are legal to possess and consume, and there has not been a true clinical study that proves such possible side effects are linked to medical problems of steroid users. There has been several cases where someone has died and an autopsy showed the person was using steroids. Some advocates believe that because steroids are legal, and since it's the decision of the user to take the drug, steroids are not causing a problem in society. Alcohol and cigarettes are consumed by millions, causing deteriorating effects on their bodies, but there has never been a protest to put a ban on the items because of their harmful nature.

So how are steroids any different? Some people may state that the wide spread use of steroids among athletes is forcing young upcoming athletes to use steroids. This is because they know they can not compete adequately against their opponents who are using steroids to achieve higher levels of performance. One might say this is how competition works though. Race car drivers and gymnasts are out there every day, pushing themselves harder and harder, going just a little faster, or doing a new, more difficult trick. Many believe they are forced by their own desire to win, and the hazardous risks they take, be it taking a corner a little faster or pulling an extra flip in a routine, are no different than the risks a football player, wrestler, or weight lifter takes when they choose to use steroids to increase their skills. Many believe these reasons make steroid abuse morally justified, and say their use in sports and other activities are just an added element in boosting performance.

It is true, there has not been any defined medical research to prove steroid abuse is linked to severe medical implications, but words of warning from chronic users dealing with massive medical difficulties they believe were a result of steroid abuse is just cause to prove the harmful effects of steroids. Alcohol and cigarettes are major contributors to the deaths of thousands each year. Frequently we see a family member, or friend, suffering from diseases and health to take necessary action in order to help an abuser with his addiction.

 

1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia:

The Atlanta Games were certainly the largest (a record 197 nations competed), most logistically complicated Olympics to date and perhaps the most hyped and overcommercialized as well. Despite all the troubles that organizers faced, from computer scoring snafus and transportation problems to a horrific terrorist attack, these Olympics had some of the best stories ever.

The Games began so joyously with Muhammad Ali, the world's best-known sports figure now stricken by illness, igniting the Olympic cauldron. Sadly, just eight days later horror was the prevailing mood after a terrorist's bomb ripped apart a peaceful Friday evening in Centennial Olympic Park. In the explosion, one woman was killed, 111 people were injured and the entire world was reminded of the terror and tragedy of Munich in 1972.

As they did in '72, the Games would go on. In track and field, Michael Johnson delivered on his much-anticipated, yet still startling, double in the 200 and 400 meters. One thing that many didn't foresee is that he would be matched by France's Marie-Jose Perec, who converted her own 200-400 double, albeit with much less attention. Carl Lewis pulled out one last bit of magic to win the long jump for the ninth gold medal of his amazing Olympic career. Donovan Bailey set a world record in the 100 and led Canada to a win over a faltering U.S. team in the 4x100 relay.

The U.S. women's gymnastics squad took the team gold after Kerri Strug hobbled up and completed her final gutsy vault in the Games' most compelling moment. Swimmer Amy Van Dyken became the first American woman to win four golds in a single Games. Ireland's Michelle Smith won three golds (and a bronze) of her own, but her victories were somewhat tainted by controversy surrounding unproven charges of drug use.

The USA fared well in team sports also. The men's basketball “Dream Team” was back and, predictably, stomped the competition on its way back to the winners' podium. Also the U.S. women won gold at the Olympic debut of two sports–softball and soccer.

1

United States

44

32

25

101

221

2

Russia

26

21

16

63

136

3

Germany

20

18

27

65

123

4

China

16

22

12

50

104

5

France

15

7

15

37

74

6

Ital

13

10

12

35

71

7

Australia

9

9

23

41

68

8

South Korea

7

15

5

27

56

9

Cuba

9

8

8

25

51

10

Ukraine

9

2

12

23

43

1990-1994 Sports Scores:
  • 1990              

Super Bowl

San Francisco d. Denver (55-10)                            

World Series

Cincinnati d. Oakland A's (4-0)

NBA Championship

Detroit d. Portland (4-1)

Stanley Cup

Edmonton d. Boston (4-1)

Wimbledon

Women: Martina Navratilova d. Z. Garrison (6-4 6-1)

Men: Stefan Edberg d. B. Becker (6-2 6-2 3-6 3-6 6-4)

Kentucky Derby Champion

Unbridled

NCAA Basketball Championship

UNLV d. Duke (103-73)

NCAA Football Champions

Colorado (AP, FW, NFF) (11-1-1) & Georgia Tech (UPI) (11-0-1)

World Cup

W. Germany d. Argentina (1-0)

  • 1991

Super Bowl

NY Giants d. Buffalo (20-19)

World Series

Minnesota d. Atlanta Braves (4-3)

NBA Championship

Chicago d. LA Lakers (4-1)

Stanley Cup

Pittsburgh d. Minnesota (4-2)

Wimbledon

Women: Steffi Graf d. G. Sabatini (6-4 3-6 8-6)

Men: Michael Stich d. B. Becker (6-4 7-6 6-4)

Kentucky Derby Champion

Strike the Gold

NCAA Basketball Championship

Duke d. Kansas (72-65)

NCAA Football Champions

Miami-FL (AP) (12-0-0) & Washington (USA, FW, NFF) (12-0-0)

  • 1992

Super Bowl

Washington d. Buffalo (37-24)

World Series

Toronto d. Atlanta Braves (4-2)

NBA Championship

Chicago d. Portland (4-2)

Stanley Cup

Pittsburgh d. Chicago (4-0)

Wimbledon

Women: Steffi Graf d. M. Seles (6-2 6-1)

Men: Andre Agassi d. G. Ivanisevic (6-7 6-4 6-4 1-6 6-4)

Kentucky Derby Champion

Lil E. Tee

NCAA Basketball Championship

Duke d. Michigan (71-51)

NCAA Football Champions

Alabama (13-0-0)

  • 1993

Super Bowl

Dallas d. Buffalo (52-17)

World Series

Toronto d. Philadelphia Phillies (4-2)

NBA Championship

Chicago d. Phoenix (4-2)

Stanley Cup

Montreal d. Los Angeles (4-1)

Wimbledon

Women: Steffi Graf d. J. Novotna (7-6 1-6 6-4)

Men: Pete Sampras d. J. Courier (7-6 7-6 3-6 6-3)

Kentucky Derby Champion

Sea Hero

NCAA Basketball Championship

North Carolina d. Michigan (77-71)

NCAA Football Champions

Florida St. (12-1-0)

  • 1994

Super Bowl

Dallas d. Buffalo (30-13)

World Series

Not Held

NBA Championship

Houston d. New York (4-3)

Stanley Cup

NY Rangers d. Vancouver (4-3)

Wimbledon

Women: Conchita Martinez d. M. Navratilova (6-4 3-6 6-3)

Men: Pete Sampras d. G. Ivanisevic (7-6 7-6 6-0)

Kentucky Derby Champion

Go For Gin

NCAA Basketball Championship

Arkansas d. Duke (76-72)

NCAA Football Champions

Nebraska (13-0-0)

World Cup

Brazil d. Italy (3-2 (shootout))

1995-1999 Sports Scores:
  • 1995

Super Bowl

San Francisco d. San Diego (49-26)

World Series

Atlanta Braves d. Cleveland (4-2)

NBA Championship

Houston d. Orlando (4-0)

Stanley Cup

New Jersey d. Detroit (4-0)

Wimbledon

Women: Steffi Graf d. A.S. Vicario (4-6 6-1 7-5)

Men: Pete Sampras d. B. Becker (6-7 6-2 6-4 6-2)

Kentucky Derby Champion

Thunder Gulch

NCAA Basketball Championship

UCLA d. Arkansas (89-78)

NCAA Football Champions

Nebraska (12-0-0)

1996

Super Bowl

Dallas d. Pittsburgh (27-17)

World Series

New York Yankees d. Atlanta Braves (4-2)

NBA Championship

Chicago d. Seattle (4-2)

Stanley Cup

Colorado d. Florida (4-0)

Wimbledon

Women: Steffi Graf d. A.S. Vicario (6-3 7-5)

Men: Richard Krajicek d. M. Washington (6-3 6-4 6-3)

Kentucky Derby Champion

Grindstone

NCAA Basketball Championship

Kentucky d. Syracuse (76-67)

NCAA Football Champions

Florida (12-1)

  • 1997

Super Bowl

Green Bay d. New England (35-21)

World Series

Florida Marlins d. Cleveland (4-3)

NBA Championship

Chicago d. Utah (4-2)

Stanley Cup

Detroit d. Philadelphia (4-0)

Wimbledon

Women: Martina Hingis d. J. Novotna (2-6 6-3 6-3)

Men: Pete Sampras d. C. Pioline (6-4 6-2 6-4)

Kentucky Derby Champion

Silver Charm

NCAA Basketball Championship

Arizona d. Kentucky (84-79 OT)

NCAA Football Champions

Michigan (AP) (12-0) & Nebraska (ESPN/USA) (13-0)

  • 1998

Super Bowl

Denver d. Green Bay (31-24)

World Series

New York Yankees d. San Diego (4-0)

NBA Championship

Chicago d. Utah (4-2)

Stanley Cup

Detroit d. Washington (4-0)

Wimbledon

Women: Jana Novotna d. N. Tauziat (6-4 7-6)

Men: Pete Sampras d. G. Ivanisevic (6-7 7-6 6-4 3-6 6-2)

Kentucky Derby Champion Real Quiet

NCAA Basketball Championship

Kentucky d. Utah (78-69)

World Cup

France d. Brazil (3-0)

  • 1999

Super Bowl

Dnver d. Atlanta (34-19)

NBA Championship

San Antonio d. New York (4-1)

Stanley Cup

Dallas d. Buffalo (4-2)

NCAA Basketball Championship Connecticut d. Duke (77-74)